Day 4 – Teachers as Writers

Hey everyone. Here is the recap for 1/21/2016.

Before class, we read Cutler’s “To Teach Effective Writing, Model Effective Writing” and Kittle’s “Writing Giants, Columbine, and the Queen of Route 16”. Both of these readings expanded on the idea of mentor texts/writing models and on teachers as writers.

At the start of class, we had a good discussion about the blog. I noticed a few questions in particular that we focused on.

  • Why do we have a ‘looking ahead’ portion in our blog posts? The looking ahead portion is to connect us to materials outside of class. These have been articles, but they can be videos, news, and quotes (from other courses or readings). By looking for the articles, you are developing a good practice of building a repertoire of professional materials. By reading them, you are able to think about your future classroom, participate in a larger educational community, and develop a deeper understanding of what you covered in class.
  • What are the benefits of having a blog in a secondary school? We talked about how having a blog in one place gathers information together, making it easier to look through. It also prevents information from being ‘lost’. Sometimes, when we leave class, we forget the little things- like what we wrote on whiteboards or our small group discussions. A blog would be useful for students to hold onto their learning. We also saw how blog writing fulfilled tothe need for writing to be shared and for students to be writing. The shared space creates a community and provides an audience for students.
  • I know. That sounds too perfect. There were several issues we thought we might face. Student privacy was a big issue. How can teachers maintain student privacy in a public space? We also considered students who could abuse a blog by exploiting access or by not pulling their weight. If a student doesn’t do their work or if a student takes over the site, then the rest of the students lose out on a learning opportunity. How can a teacher control the website while also allowing student ownership?

I think the take away from this was that we are still working out the details on the blog. It is something I expect we will discuss often throughout the semester.

Moving away from the blog and to our readings, we discussed how seeing teachers as writers is still ‘new’. Not everyone has had a teacher who modeled the struggles, process, and successes of writing. Benko asked us to think about if we would complete our own assignments. Are you willing to do what you assign your students? Modeling the writing process might make the difference.

To continue our conversation on this, Benko proposed three questions about the Dean, Cutler, and Kittle readings. You tweeted your responses.

How does the Cutler reading add to the Dean reading from Tuesday? How is it different?
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How did Penny Kittle’s “real life” connect to her teaching life? What does this mean for us as teachers, and as teacher-writers?

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6C22419D-CFFE-40FF-8095-3BD157DD96BB.pngWhat do these readings (Cutler & Kittle) mean for us as teachers? What will we have to DO in our classrooms? What will people SEE when they watch us teach if we are living out the recommendations of these two authors?

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It looks like we have a good understanding of what we need to do: WRITE!

Instead of just reading about teachers are writers, the importance of models, and writing to be shared, we are going to do it. The This I Believe assignment is a good example of applying these three beliefs.

For the assignment today, we look at the similarities between the three This I Believe essays from earlier this week. We noticed that all essays:

  • have authors who were inspired/ are inspiring
  • describes stories over time
  • have a  grander meaning/ message
  • are personal/ in a unique voice
  • give a sense of value
  • express discomfort
  • express change
  • are relatable to an audience
  • are written as narratives

What is bolded are the things we agreed were the necessary parts to a This I Believe essay. By studying models, we have a better understanding of what is expected of us. (Hey! Dean said this would happen!)

Now we just need to write. Remember when Benko said that starting is sometimes the hardest part of writing? That was when we did our Writing Territories activity! We listed our writing territories to show that we do have things we are comfortable about writing. You can use these to start your drafts.

Looking ahead, I wanted to give you some links about successful blogs in the classroom. Especially since we talked a lot about blogs in classrooms today.

Here is an edutopia article “Blogging in the 21st Century Classroom” and a busyteacher article “Considerations on Blogging in the ESL Classroom”. I know some of you aren’t concentrating in ESL, but the article can still prepare you for ESL students you will likely have in your classrooms. That article also looks into student privacy and provides a set of rules for students.

Good luck with your This I Believes! I look forward to hearing about them.

-Emilie

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